Category Archives: Human Rights

These groups advocate for the rights of minorities and other disparate groups.

American Friends Service Committee

The American Friends Service Committee is a practical expression of the faith of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). Committed to the principles of nonviolence and justice, it seeks in its work and witness to draw on the transforming power of love, human and divine.

We recognize that the leadings of the Spirit and the principles of truth found through Friends’ experience and practice are not the exclusive possession of any group. Thus, the AFSC draws into its work people of many faiths and backgrounds who share the values that animate its life and who bring to it a rich variety of experiences and spiritual insights.

This AFSC community works to transform conditions and relationships both in the world and in ourselves, which threaten to overwhelm what is precious in human beings. We nurture the faith that conflicts can be resolved nonviolently, that enmity can be transformed into friendship, strife into cooperation, poverty into well-being, and injustice into dignity and participation. We believe that ultimately goodness can prevail over evil, and oppression in all its many forms can give way.

We seek to understand and address the root causes of poverty, injustice, and war. We hope to act with courage and vision in taking initiatives that may not be popular.

We are called to confront, nonviolently, powerful institutions of violence, evil, oppression, and injustice. Such actions may engage us in creative tumult and tension in the process of basic change. We seek opportunities to help reconcile enemies and to facilitate a peaceful and just resolution of conflict.

We work to relieve and prevent suffering through both immediate aid and long-term development and seek to serve the needs of people on all sides of violent strife.

We ground our work at the community level both at home and abroad in partnership with those who suffer the conditions we seek to change and informed by their strength and vision.

Seeking to transform the institutions of society, we are ourselves transformed in the process. As we work in the world around us, our awareness grows that the AFSC’s own organizational life must change to reflect the same goals we urge others to achieve.

Website:  http://www.afsc.org/about/default.htm

Contact:
637 S. Dearborn
3rd Floor
Chicago, IL 60605
Phone:  312-427-2533 Fax: 312-427-4171
mmcconnell-glr@afsc.org

Coalition of African, Arab, Asian, European and Latino Immigrants of Illinois

    
  Coalition of African, Arab, Asian, European and Latino Immigrants of Illinois  
  CAAAELII is a groundbreaking cross-racial, cross-cultural collaborative. Our work is centered on creating a new model for organizations serving immigrant and other disenfranchised communities: an organic amalgam of leadership development, organizing, activism, concrete social change and direct services. It is one of the largest immigrant-led coalitions in the country. Their mission statement is: To strengthen diverse voices of inter-generational immigrant and refugee communities by building alliances through a transformative process to develop grassroots power that impacts public policy. To engage the people and raise their voices to assert human and civil rights, promoting peoples’ participation and integration into a democratic society.  
 
Website:  http://www.caaaelii.org
Address:  4300 N. Hermitage Ave
  Chicago, IL 60613
Contact:  Marc Kelley
Phone:  (773) 248-1019
Email:  contact@caaaelii.org
 

American Friends Service Committee

American Friends Logo

The American Friends Service Committee is a practical expression of the faith of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). Committed to the principles of nonviolence and justice, it seeks in its work and witness to draw on the transforming power of love, human and divine.

We recognize that the leadings of the Spirit and the principles of truth found through Friends’ experience and practice are not the exclusive possession of any group. Thus, the AFSC draws into its work people of many faiths and backgrounds who share the values that animate its life and who bring to it a rich variety of experiences and spiritual insights.

This AFSC community works to transform conditions and relationships both in the world and in ourselves, which threaten to overwhelm what is precious in human beings. We nurture the faith that conflicts can be resolved nonviolently, that enmity can be transformed into friendship, strife into cooperation, poverty into well-being, and injustice into dignity and participation. We believe that ultimately goodness can prevail over evil, and oppression in all its many forms can give way.

We seek to understand and address the root causes of poverty, injustice, and war. We hope to act with courage and vision in taking initiatives that may not be popular.

We are called to confront, nonviolently, powerful institutions of violence, evil, oppression, and injustice. Such actions may engage us in creative tumult and tension in the process of basic change. We seek opportunities to help reconcile enemies and to facilitate a peaceful and just resolution of conflict.

We work to relieve and prevent suffering through both immediate aid and long-term development and seek to serve the needs of people on all sides of violent strife.

We ground our work at the community level both at home and abroad in partnership with those who suffer the conditions we seek to change and informed by their strength and vision.

We work with all people, the poor and the materially comfortable, the disenfranchised and the powerful in pursuit of justice. We encourage collaboration in social transformation towards a society that recognizes the dignity of each person. We believe that the Spirit can move among all these groups, making great change possible.

Seeking to transform the institutions of society, we are ourselves transformed in the process. As we work in the world around us, our awareness grows that the AFSC’s own organizational life must change to reflect the same goals we urge others to achieve.
http://www.afsc.org/chicago/default.htm

637 S. Dearborn, Ste. 3
Chicago, IL 60605

Phone: 312-427-2533
Fax: 312-427-4171
Email: Chicagoinfo@afsc.org

Center For New Community

Center for New community

The Center for New Community is committed to being “on the ground,” working with communities, organizations, coalitions, and congregations that share a vision of a democratic future based on human rights, justice and equality.

 We need you if we are to make real the vision we share for a new community, and a nation in which the dimity and value of all humanity is manifest.

 We invite you to join us in that journey. With your involvement and support we can, indeed, transform the world!

 We invite you to become a member of the Center for New Community today!

 The mission of the Center for New Community is to build community, justice, and equality.

 We believe that a broad and concerted effort by individuals, families, organizations, congregations, and communities to address contemporary social, economic and racial justice issues is both necessary and achievable.

 Grounded in many faith traditions, we seek to live out new relationships that lead to ongoing acts of community building and organizing to achieve that end.

 From border to border and coast to coast, in village, small town and city alike – the work of the Center for New Community is being seeded and rooted.
 
  P.O. Box 479327 
Chicago 
IL 
USA 
60647 

  phone312-266-0319 
 Fax 312-266-0278

 http://www.newcomm.org/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1

Urban League

MISSION STATEMENT

Established in 1916, the Chicago Urban League is a civil rights organization that empowers and inspires individuals to reach and exceed their economic potential. The League focuses on growing Chicago’s African American workforce and business community.

OUR BACKGROUND

Founded in 1916 by an interracial group of community leaders to help rural African Americans migrating from the South adjust to northern urban living, the Chicago Urban League was incorporated in the state of Illinois on June 13, 1917. The Chicago Urban League is pursuing three strategies that advance our mission:

  • ensuring that African American children are well-educated and equipped for economic self-reliance in the 21st century;
  • helping adults attain economic self-sufficiency through gainful employment, home ownership, entrepreneurship and wealth accumulation;
  • and ensuring the civil rights of African Americans by eradicating barriers to equal participation in the economic and social mainstream of American life.

http://www.thechicagourbanleague.org/index.php

The Chicago Urban League
4510 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago , IL 60653

(773) 285-5800 office

(773) 285-5772 fax

Center for Campus Free Speech

Center for Campus Free Speech

Mission
Universities improve the quality of our society and strengthen future leaders through the discovery of new knowledge and the questioning of conventional wisdom. These goals are best achieved in a thriving marketplace of ideas whose participants are actively encouraged to seek out and exchange new ideas while exploring a diverse array of opinions.

This mission extends beyond the classroom to extracurricular opportunities created by students to enhance their higher education experience. Students translate academic lessons into hands-on experience through internship programs, leadership positions, and volunteer opportunities within groups they create and support. The entire campus community benefits from the cultural events, public policy debates, and guest speakers provided by student organizations and programs.

There have been numerous legal, legislative and administrative initiatives to stifle the voices of students by restricting access to student fees, limiting access to university facilities and censoring student publications, all of which has a detrimental impact on the quality of the university experience. The university provides an important platform for the expression of a multitude of opinions and deserves heightened protection from attacks on freedom of speech.

The Center for Campus Free Speech was created by a variety of members of the higher education community – students, faculty, administrators, and others – to protect and to promote free speech on campuses. The Center acts as a clearinghouse of information, provides specialized support to campuses, and connects concerned educators, administrators, lawyers and students into a national network. The Center draws advice and guidance from a group of leaders in the higher education and legal communities.

Website: http://www.campusspeech.org
Contact Information:
Center for Campus Free Speech
407 S. Dearborn, Suite 701
Chicago, IL 60605

Phone: 312-291-0396

Email: center@campusspeech.org